The Global Fool

our planet is our village

Gourmet Grasshoppers and Designer Breeders
Jun30

Gourmet Grasshoppers and Designer Breeders

By The Editors It’s all about raising awareness and providing the necessary tools to make it globally feasible, bringing to the Western world what is common in many other places around the globe: eating insects, or better eating gourmet insect meals. In a previous post (Edible Insects: Will They Become a Global Diet Staple?) we wrote: “The human population keeps growing – by 2050, it’s likely there will be 9 billion people on our planet – or our village.  Food may become scarce.  What can we do to make sure there is enough of it for the growing population?  We need to think differently, and look across cultures to find ways for increasing food security. Edible insects have always been a part of human diets. It is estimated that over 2 billion people normally eat them. Insects are considered delicacies in many parts of the world. Insects are high in protein, fat and mineral contents. They can be eaten whole or ground into a powder or paste, and incorporated into other foods.” Very recently, the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) started to raise awareness on the value of insects as food source by publishing a book entitled “Edible insects – future prospects for food and feed security”. The book draws on a broad range of scientific research. Now, the work of Mansour Ourasanah, a US-based designer who grew up in Togo, West Africa, adds artistic and applied value to that provided by scientific research. In 2012, Mansour designed the “LEPSIS”, a kitchen appliance for breeding and freezing grasshoppers.  The design is among the finalists for this year’s Index: Award, which will be presented in Denmark in August to honor innovative solutions to global challenges. Mansour says, “In order to move toward a sustainable future, we must do away with our culinary hangups and redefine the paradigm of food. This conviction inspired the aesthetic treatment of LEPSIS. Growing grasshoppers can be messy, but the clear acrylic walls and the wooden base reflect my desire to make this activity a natural and transparent part of the urban kitchen environment by 2050. “ Below, you can see what the LEPSIS looks like. Mansour describes the LEPSIS with these words: “LEPSIS comprises four modular units that attach and detach with ease for functional flexibility and space efficiency in small urban dwellings. When combined, the units create a vessel optimized for neatly breeding, feeding, harvesting and killing grasshoppers, before turning them into food. The details of the vessel visually dictate how the units are assembled, making the process intuitive and fluid. The assembled vessel, inspired by traditional clay pots, is a functional kitchen appliance, a decorative...

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Edible Insects:  Raising Awareness
May16

Edible Insects: Raising Awareness

By The Editors As mentioned in the previous post, a few days ago a publication released from the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) started to raise awareness on the value of insects as food source. The publication is a book entitled “Edible insects – future prospects for food and feed security” and draws on a broad range of scientific research.  It’s the result of a collaboration with the Laboratory of Entomology at Wageningen University in the Netherlands and part of a broad-based effort at FAO to examine the gathering and rearing of insects as a viable option for alleviating food insecurity. Although the majority of edible insects are gathered from forest habitats, there is increased interest in insect farming — novel mass-rearing systems are being explored in many countries. Therefore, insects make important contributions to ecosystems, diets, food security and livelihoods in both developed and developing countries. The Assistant Director-General of the FAO Forestry Department and the Managing Director of the Department of Plant Sciences Group at Wageningen University and Research Centre say in the book foreword “We hope that it will help raise the profile of insects as sources of food and feed in national and international food agencies. We also hope that it attracts the attention of farmers, the media, the public at large and decision-makers in governments, multilateral and bilateral donor agencies, investment firms, research centres, aid agencies and the food and feed industries.” Watch the short video below to understand better the value of insects in the diet and the effort made to increase awareness about...

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Edible Insects – Will They Become a Global Diet Staple?
May16

Edible Insects – Will They Become a Global Diet Staple?

By The Editors The human population keeps growing – by 2050, it’s likely there will be 9 billion people on our planet – or our village.  Food may become scarce.  What can we do to make sure there is enough of it for the growing population?  We need to think differently, and look across cultures to find ways for increasing food security. Edible insects have always been a part of human diets.  It is estimated that over 2 billion people normally eat them.  Insects are considered delicacies in many parts of the world, particularly in the tropics. However, in many cultures, there is a main barrier to eating insects — “consumer disgust”. To start educating the world about the benefits of edible insects, the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) released a few days ago a very interesting publication on this unexplored (for many of us) food source. Insects are high in protein, fat and mineral contents. They can be eaten whole or ground into a powder or paste, and incorporated into other foods.  According to the FAO publication, farming insects for human and animal consumption is particularly relevant at this time.   Population growth and urbanization have increased the demand for food while simultaneously harming the environment.  Land and water pollution from intensive livestock production and over-grazing are leading to forest degradation, thereby contributing to climate change. Insect farming might help alleviate these problems. Insect consumption is not expected to enter the Western culture in the immediate future. While waiting, it is important to raise awareness about the potential of insects as food, so to increase the level of acceptance among consumers — especially in the Western countries....

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