The Global Fool

our planet is our village

Indigenous Knowledge?  Yes, It’s Global Knowledge
May28

Indigenous Knowledge? Yes, It’s Global Knowledge

By The Editors Sharing global knowledge?  Yes, indispensable knowledge on the preservation of ecosystems and biodiversity, the sustainable use of protected natural areas, as well as development and food security — all related to the indigenous peoples of Africa, Asia, Latin America and other countries, such as Canada and Australia.  Indispensable knowledge that is being shared these days (May 26 – 29) in the capital city of Australia’s Northern Territory, Darwin. The occasion?  The first World Indigenous Network (WIN) conference, which calls on native delegates from over 50 countries to help build a strong foundation for an innovative and well-grounded enduring World Indigenous Network. According to the World Indigenous Network website, “The journey of the World Indigenous Network began on a warm day in August 2011, when two men, sitting on the shores of the beautiful Sunday Island, part of the Buccaneer Archipelago in the West Kimberley of Western Australia, talked about the idea of an international knowledge sharing network for Indigenous land and sea managers. They formed a partnership that day, with a desire to share their vision with the world.  These two men were Tony Burke, the Australian Government Environment Minister and Wayne Bergmann, the CEO of KRED Enterprises. The Kimberley Land Council in Western Australia established KRED to seek out and develop business and job opportunities for the Kimberley Aboriginal people.” Indigenous knowledge – which brings together different facets of knowing, seeing, and thinking that are passed down orally from generation to generation and result from thousands of years of experimentation and innovation – is global knowledge, knowledge that we can all use to face development and environmental...

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Udacity, Georgia Tech and AT&T – Vision and Revolution Come Together
May17

Udacity, Georgia Tech and AT&T – Vision and Revolution Come Together

By The Editors In the last few days, a so-called “bold move” has generated lots of discussion in the higher education community – someone (or more than one) says that the “bold move” has actually generated shock.  Others call the move “revolutionary”. Question: What is the “bold move” we’re referring to?  Answer: A very special announcement. Georgia Tech and Udacity, in collaboration with AT&T, will offer a sought-after graduate computer science degree, traditionally offered on the Georgia Tech campus, through online instruction.  What brings shock, though, is not the online format, but the cost — the degree (a fully accredited Georgia Tech degree) will cost about 80% less than the current on campus curriculum (we’re talking about $ 7,000 versus about $ 40,000).  The program will be offered for the first time in the Fall of 2014. Yes, the partnership of Georgia Tech, Udacity and AT&T is innovative, but more innovative is the cost. And, for what the global fool is concerned, online + low cost will make the program global. The Georgia Tech College of Computing OMS CS brand new website starts with the following sentence: “The Georgia Institute of Technology, Udacity and AT&T have teamed up to offer the first accredited Online Master of Science in Computer Science (OMS CS) that students can earn exclusively through the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) delivery format and for a fraction of the cost of traditional, on-campus programs.” — yes, the cost factor is in the first sentence….. It goes on to say:  “This collaboration brings together leaders in education, MOOCs and industry to apply the disruptive power of massively open online teaching to widen the pipeline of high-quality, educated talent needed in computer science fields.” (bold and italics are mine) In few more sentences, the description manages to communicate the “revolutionary” aspect of this enterprise. The announcement by Sebastian Thrun, a co-founder of Udacity, is for sure worth reading – he compares this moment to the one he proposed to his wife.  The entire announcement, though, conveys how the individuals involved in this enterprise feel like true visionaries and revolutionaries – and perhaps they are. Between vision and revolution, the higher education community is shaken....

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Let’s Invent a Global Society – Lee Bollinger on Global Challenges
May07

Let’s Invent a Global Society – Lee Bollinger on Global Challenges

By The Editors In the video below, Lee C. Bollinger, President of Columbia University, and Chrystia Freeland, Thomson Reuters Consumer News Editor, discuss how Columbia University tackles the challenges of rapid global changes – the changes we have described in a previous post on the great acceleration, results of the events that define the space age and the information age. Lee Bollinger’s approach is matter-of-fact acceptance of the global changes we are undergoing – he describes well the uncertainty we’re facing these days and points out how much we don’t know –  and especially how much it is that academic institutions don’t know. The solution is to be open and invent a new society, a global...

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