The Global Fool

our planet is our village

Global Education
May12

Global Education

By The Editors In a previous post, I introduced the concept of global education as the education perspective expressed in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The concept of global education is defined in more detail by the Global Education website as a set of five perspectives: 1) Interdependence and globalisation, 2) Identity and cultural diversity, 3) Social justice and human rights, 4) Peace building and conflict resolution, 5) Sustainable futures. The Global Education website, which illustrates all aspects of the Global Education Project, has been developed and is maintained by Education Services Australia, a national, not-for-profit company owned by all Australian education ministers. The five perspectives, detailed below, provide a framework for global education. Interdependence and globalisation – an understanding of the complex social, economic and political links between people and the impact that changes have on each other Identity and cultural diversity – an understanding of self and one’s own culture, and being open to the culture of others Social justice and human rights – an understanding of the impact of inequality and discrimination, the importance of standing up for our own rights and our responsibility to respect the rights of others Peace building and conflict resolution – an understanding of the importance of building and maintaining positive and trusting relationships and ways conflict can be prevented or peacefully resolved Sustainable futures – an understanding of the ways in which we can meet our current needs without diminishing the quality of the environment or reducing the capacity of future generations to meet their own needs. I believe that the second perspective, Identity and cultural diversity, should be considered the starting point of a globalized curriculum – exploration of identity and cultural diversity is mostly an introspective endeavor and, therefore, provides the basis for integration of all the other...

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Let’s Invent a Global Society – Lee Bollinger on Global Challenges
May07

Let’s Invent a Global Society – Lee Bollinger on Global Challenges

By The Editors In the video below, Lee C. Bollinger, President of Columbia University, and Chrystia Freeland, Thomson Reuters Consumer News Editor, discuss how Columbia University tackles the challenges of rapid global changes – the changes we have described in a previous post on the great acceleration, results of the events that define the space age and the information age. Lee Bollinger’s approach is matter-of-fact acceptance of the global changes we are undergoing – he describes well the uncertainty we’re facing these days and points out how much we don’t know –  and especially how much it is that academic institutions don’t know. The solution is to be open and invent a new society, a global...

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The Information Age
May04

The Information Age

By The Editors The Information Age is the era shaped by information and communication technologies and by information-based industries.  It partially overlaps with the Space Age — The Space Age started in the late 1950s with the launch of the world’s first artificial satellite, whereas the Information age started in the mid-1970s in association with the Digital Revolution. One of the recognized fathers of the Information Age is Norbert Wiener, the inventor of ”cybernetics”.  He defined Cybernetics as the science of “control and communication in the animal and the machine”.  Although the prefix “cyber” is now widely used for about everything – from sex to art – and is generally associated with virtual reality, cybernetics studies the feedback mechanisms that allow information to self-regulate a system, from biological mechanisms to artificial ones.  Norbert Weiner’s anticipated human communication in a technical world. I believe that cybernetics not only spear-headed the Information Age – it also describes the principles of global connectedness in the Information Age:  “Cybernetics is applicable when a system being analyzed is involved in a closed signaling loop; that is, where action by the system generates some change in its environment and that change is reflected in that system in some manner (feedback) that triggers a system change, originally referred to as a “circular causal”...

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The Space Age
May03

The Space Age

By The Editors On October 4, 1957, the 184-pound Sputnik 1 was successfully launched by the Soviet Union and entered Earth’s orbit.  Sputnik 1 was the world’s first artificial satellite, only 56 centimeters (22 inches) in diameter, orbiting the Earth in 96 minutes.  Its launch ushered in what is now called the “Space Age“, a new era characterized by a variety of political, scientific and technological achievements accompanied by very rapid changes with profound societal implications. During the 1960s, the Space Age led to an environmental revolution.  Indeed, the Space Age has been pivotal in shaping how we perceive our planet.  Marina Benjamin, author of “Rocket Dreams: How the Space Age Shaped Our Vision of a World Beyond”, argues that space exploration has changed our worldviews in more ways than one.  She writes: “The impact of seeing the Earth from space focused our energies on the home planet in unprecedented ways, dramatically affecting our relationship to the natural world and our appreciation of the greater community of mankind, and prompting a revolution in our understanding of the Earth as a living system”. Whether or not we’re still living in the Space Age may be debatable, as the current period is often referred to as Information Age.  However, either in a Space or in an Information Age, we are for sure witnessing the Great...

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The Schwarzman Scholars Program: Focus on China
May01

The Schwarzman Scholars Program: Focus on China

By The Editors The $300 million “Schwarzman Scholars at Tsinghua University” program, jointly founded by Tsinghua University in Beijing and Stephen Schwarzman, was launched on April 21 and will emulate the famous Rhodes Scholarship program, the oldest and most celebrated international fellowship in the world.  The launch ceremony was held at Tsinghua University. Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Barack Obama both sent congratulatory letters. Starting in June 2016, every year for the next 50 years, 200 students from all around the world will receive the scholarship for a one-year master’s program at Tsinghua University in public policy, international relations, economics, business or engineering.  During the scholarship year, Schwarzman scholars will travel around China and will meet Chinese leaders. Forty-five percent of the scholars will come from the United States, 20 percent from China, and 35 percent from Australia, Canada, Europe, Latin America and the rest of Asia. Africa may be added later.  Together, the scholars are expected to participate in an international network that can bridge differences between China and the...

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