The Global Fool

our planet is our village

Gourmet Grasshoppers and Designer Breeders
Jun30

Gourmet Grasshoppers and Designer Breeders

By The Editors It’s all about raising awareness and providing the necessary tools to make it globally feasible, bringing to the Western world what is common in many other places around the globe: eating insects, or better eating gourmet insect meals. In a previous post (Edible Insects: Will They Become a Global Diet Staple?) we wrote: “The human population keeps growing – by 2050, it’s likely there will be 9 billion people on our planet – or our village.  Food may become scarce.  What can we do to make sure there is enough of it for the growing population?  We need to think differently, and look across cultures to find ways for increasing food security. Edible insects have always been a part of human diets. It is estimated that over 2 billion people normally eat them. Insects are considered delicacies in many parts of the world. Insects are high in protein, fat and mineral contents. They can be eaten whole or ground into a powder or paste, and incorporated into other foods.” Very recently, the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) started to raise awareness on the value of insects as food source by publishing a book entitled “Edible insects – future prospects for food and feed security”. The book draws on a broad range of scientific research. Now, the work of Mansour Ourasanah, a US-based designer who grew up in Togo, West Africa, adds artistic and applied value to that provided by scientific research. In 2012, Mansour designed the “LEPSIS”, a kitchen appliance for breeding and freezing grasshoppers.  The design is among the finalists for this year’s Index: Award, which will be presented in Denmark in August to honor innovative solutions to global challenges. Mansour says, “In order to move toward a sustainable future, we must do away with our culinary hangups and redefine the paradigm of food. This conviction inspired the aesthetic treatment of LEPSIS. Growing grasshoppers can be messy, but the clear acrylic walls and the wooden base reflect my desire to make this activity a natural and transparent part of the urban kitchen environment by 2050. “ Below, you can see what the LEPSIS looks like. Mansour describes the LEPSIS with these words: “LEPSIS comprises four modular units that attach and detach with ease for functional flexibility and space efficiency in small urban dwellings. When combined, the units create a vessel optimized for neatly breeding, feeding, harvesting and killing grasshoppers, before turning them into food. The details of the vessel visually dictate how the units are assembled, making the process intuitive and fluid. The assembled vessel, inspired by traditional clay pots, is a functional kitchen appliance, a decorative...

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Hungry Planet: What The World Eats
May07

Hungry Planet: What The World Eats

By The Editors Hungry Planet: What The World Eats, has been around for a few years, but the photography is still very appealing, the descriptions insightful and the topic up to date.  Just looking at the pictures is a sure way to increase one’s awareness of different cultures.  The book also includes excerpts from leading  scientists, nutritionists and environmentalists. In true global spirit, Peter Menzel and Faith D’Aluisio traveled to twenty-four countries and visited thirty families from all around the world to find out what people eat during the course of one week.  The result of their work is 30 family profiles.  Each family’s profile includes a detailed description of their weekly food purchases; photographs of the family at home, at market, and in their community; and a portrait of the entire family surrounded by a week’s worth of groceries.  Menzel and D’Aluisio are also very generous in sharing their personal experiences in the countries they visited.  All together, this is beautiful artwork presented at the intersections of worldwide politics and nutrition. Below is a video showing some of the family...

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Globalization Collection and Chanel Globe
Apr23

Globalization Collection and Chanel Globe

By The Editors The latest Chanel collection is called “Globalization” and, during the Paris Fashion Week in March, it came with benefits: a giant, rotating, wooden replica of our planet, visibly positioned in the middle of the Grand Palais.    Does the Chanel globe provide a real global vision of our planet?  The are zillions of pin lights and 300 little flags on the globe.  The pin lights represent all our cities and the flags the 300 Chanel boutiques around the world.  It’s a Chanel globe. The globe is now gone, but virtually visiting the Grand Palais is a very pleasant Paris adventure.  Try...

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